Support Letter

Check the map below! Has your state submitted a letter of support? Send yours today!

Directions for Submission of Letters (Download detailed instructions):

1. Select a letter below, complete the required blank information sections (name, customization, etc), print and sign.

2. Mail your lettr to the following address:

Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o Stamp Development
US Postal Service
475 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Room 3300
Washington, DC 20260-3501


Letter 1:

To: Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee
c/o Stamp Development
US Postal Service
475 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Room 3300
Washington, DC 20260-3501

Re: Support for Petition for Recognition of Gibran Kahlil Gibran through a US Postage Stamp

Dear Citizens’ Stamp Advisory Committee Members:

This letter is written to you in support of the campaign for a commemorative stamp in honor of Gibran Kahlil Gibran to be issued in 2016. Born in 1883 in Bcharre, Lebanon, Gibran immigrated to the United States in 1894. He lived most of his life in New York, writing his works in English to later be translated to Arabic among many other languages. Gibran’s works are strikingly influential worldwide. He is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind only Shakespeare and Lao Tzu. He made contributions to literary art as well as visual art through his magnificent drawings and paintings. Gibran was an integral part of the fabric of writers, truly illustrating the illustrious “melting-pot” narrative so commonly referred to in this wonderful country. His words have been quoted in many speeches, and have influenced songs by superstar artists. John Lennon used a line from Gibran’s Sand and Foam in the song "Julia" from The Beatles' 1968 album The Beatles.

Joan Acocella best described the reach of The Prophet, Gibran’s most famous work, and its influence on American culture and life in a 2008 article in The New Yorker entitled “PROPHET MOTIVE: The Kahlil Gibran phenomenon,”

There are public schools named for Gibran in Brooklyn and Yonkers. “The Prophet” has been recited at countless weddings and funerals. It is quoted in books and articles on training art teachers, determining criminal responsibility, and enduring ectopic pregnancy, sleep disorders[...]